Trinket~Doberman National Dog Show

by on November 19, 2010

Trinket--2010 Doberman National Specialty-Topeka Kansas

This Fall, the Doberman Pinscher Club of America held its 85th National Dog Show and Convention. Over two hundred Dobermans and their owners fired up their motor homes, took off in their vans, braved the friendly skies and followed the yellow brick road to the Capital Plaza Hotel and Convention Center in Topeka, Kansas.

I clicked my ruby red Keens

and headed to Topeka to watch my mom show her Doberman, Trinket -Ch Soquel’s Last Souvinere and to be part of the fun.

The difference between a national dog show and a regular dog show is that a national dog show focuses on one breed of dogs. The Doberman pretties competed for titles in conformation, obedience, agility and rally. Dog show competitors hope the great Oz will reward their Doberman’s beauty, brains and courage with ribbons and dog show titles.

The hotel had a glass elevator which our Doberman took in stride. One night, as we crowded onto the elevator with three Dobermans and a pup, a non-dog-showing guest stepped back from the elevator door. We smiled, “There’s room.” The wiggle Doberman puppy was very inviting, while the other three Dobies looked on encouragingly.  As we held the door open, the guest tentatively stepped aboard. He stood very still as the elevator moved upward. When he exited saying, “I can’t believe I just shared an elevator with four Dobermans,” we were all glad he recognized his good fortune.

Dog shows are fun. I have been both an exhibitor and a spectator, and have always had a great time. I would encourage all dog lovers to go to an all-breed dog show at least once, and to attend a national or local specialty if you are interested in a particular breed of dog. The benefits are many …

  • Resources: Exhibitors have usually been breeding and showing dogs for many years, so they are excellent resources for grooming tips and general information about the breed. If you’re interested in adopting a purebred dog, it is extremely helpful to first attend a dog show and mingle with breeders.
  • Meet unique breeds: A Komondor will show off its long dread locks. The noble Neapolitan Mastiff, looking a little like a mini-rhino, will take its place in the breed ring. Is it a dog or a lamb? Say hello to a Bedlington Terrier! Have you even ever heard of a Peruvian Inca Orchid? When you attend a dog show, you might find this hairless wonder crossing your path.  Some shows even have a “Meet the Breeds” program, which allows you to get up close and personal with the competitors and their owners after judging.
  • Shop ‘til you drop: Most dog shows have a wide array of booths selling books, handmade clothes, collars, leashes, and pet treats, among other items. Also, representatives from major pet food companies are usually available to answer your questions about pet food and nutrition. My mother’s Doberman walked away from the Doberman National sporting more bling than Queen Elizabeth.

When you attend a dog show as a spectator, leave your own pup at home. Dogs not registered in the dog show are usually not allowed. Don’t ask questions of the handlers or breeders while they prepare for the show ring or they will growl at you. After they show, they are usually more than happy to answer your questions. Refrain from messing with the Poodle’s poofs, unwinding the Puli’s locks, or patting the crest of a Chinese Crested. If you flatten a poof that a groomer has been perfecting for hours, don’t be surprised if they come at you with their grooming scissors.

Why show? It certainly is not for the prize money, since there isn’t any. Breeders show their dogs for many reasons, chief among them to prove and promote their breeding programs. The agenda is to produce dogs that meet the breed standards, and good breeders justifiably take pride in their ability to do so. A championship is one criterion for a good breeding dog. Others include good health, appropriate breed temperament, and working ability – the intelligence and physical attributes to hunt, herd, pull a cart, aid law enforcement, do search and rescue, guard, compete in obedience or agility, and/or become a treasured companion.

My mother shows her Doberman in obedience because she enjoys interacting with her Dobie through training, competing in the show arena, earning titles, and having fun with other like-minded dog owners.

If you enjoy being with dogs and the people who love them, there is no place like a dog show!

My Odd Family loves pets. Tell us above your precious furs!

Glad you were in my Odd neighborhood. Feel free to drop by any time. Odd Loves Company and odd loves you and you and you!! I would love to hear from you in the comment section of this blog, or on Facebook or Twitter

{ 6 comments }

Kimberley Berkins

Trinket is gorgeous! Doberman’s are just so elegant. I love attending dog shows. My Dingo is a mix of many breeds but I always learn something at the dog show and love watching the obedience and agility competition.

Rob McCullough

My two dogs have come from breed rescue. Both Springer Spaniels. I am working with one in agility and hope to track the other one. I found the rescue group at a dog show. The process was long and very complete but I would really recommend it. I have great dogs.
Trinket is a beauty.

Lindsey Burnett

The National sounds like it was fun. Trinket is so pretty. I love a Sheltie and are enjoying working together in Obedience. Rose is smart and likes to be busy so we have a lot of fun. We have a CD title and in the spring, I hope we can pick up our CDX.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Virginia

I’m crazy in love with my West Highland Terrier, Joker. I met his breeder at a dog show. I don’t show him but we have a lot of fun together and he goes everywhere we go. Recently he charged and tried to bite my grown son. I know its wrong, I know I should not laugh and I don’t encourage it but God, I have wanted to bite him myself so often that I just can’t mind to much. My son accuses me of loving the dog more than I love him. I tell my son its close very close so not to push his luck.
Your mom’s dog is just beautiful.

Rudy Streng

We gave owned Dobes for 45 years, but am considering showing our new red puppy. Just looking for more info.

Katybeth

I owned and loved a red dobie boy for years. Moose finished when he was just 18 months of age. My mother does everything with her Doberman Trinket. If you need information we may be able to help. Just let us know.

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