Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

by on November 9, 2015

~★~♥~♥~★~ El Morno! ♥~★~★~♥ ~
November 9, 2015

Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

★~ Today’s Quote:I accept chaos, I’m not sure whether it accepts me. ~ Bob Dylan

★~ National Chaos Never Dies Day:

Chaos Day, Scrapple Day

Chaos Never Dies Day takes the stance that the perfect, quiet moment we’re all striving for and anticipating doesn’t – and likely never will – exist, and that we should make the most of now, chaos-and-all, and embrace the moment. I live this holiday.

★~ Scrapple Day:

Chaos Day, Scrapple Day

Scrapple, or pon haus, is similar in both composition and taste to British white pudding. Its name comes from the fact that it is composed of “scraps” of pork combined with cornmeal and spices. The mixture is formed into a mostly solid loaf, and then it is sliced and panfried before serving.

I bet you didn’t know that scrapple is the first pork food invented in America. It was created more than 200 years ago by Dutch colonists who settled near Philadelphia.

Scrapple is typically eaten for breakfast, topped with syrup or ketchup. In some regions of the United States, it is mixed with scrambled eggs. I have been told it tastes like  bacon and sausage mixed with corn meal.

★~ Today in History:

 Chaos Day, Scrapple Day , Rolling Stones

♥~ 1911 – Georges Claude of Paris, Francea applied for a patent on neon advertising signs.

♥~1967 – The first issue of Rolling Stone was published. It was started by 21-year-old Jann Wenner, who dropped out of Berkeley and borrowed $7,500 from family members and from people on a mailing list that he stole from a local radio station, and with that money he managed to put together a magazine. The cover of the first issue featured John Lennon, and in it, Wenner wrote, “Rolling Stone is not just about music, but also about the things and attitudes that the music embraces.” Today Rolling Stone has a circulation of about 1.4 million

♥~ 1961 – The Metropolitan Museum in New York obtained Rembrandt’s Aristotle Contemplating the Bust of Homer for $2.3 million. The Metropolitan raised the money from special contributions and funds given or bequeathed by friends of the museum.

♥~ 1984 – Donna Reed joined the cast of Dallas as J.R. Ewing’s new mamma, on CBS-TV. This was Reed’s first return to television since her own successful show ended in 1966. However radiantly beautiful, Reed would not score well with viewers who had become attached to Barbara Bel Geddes as Miss Ellie. Reed was written out of the script and Bel Geddes returned in 1985.

♥~ 1989 – The 27.9-mile-long Berlin Wall, the symbol of the Cold War that separated East and West Germany for 28 years, was opened.

★~Born Today:

Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day, Hedy-Lamarr

♥~ 1914–  Hedy Lamarr – She was a glamorous Hollywood actress who romanced Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy and Jimmy Stewart onscreen and was hailed as “the world’s most beautiful woman.” But Hedy Lamarr was bored. So in a private life more compelling than some of her movies, she dreamed up ways to fight the Nazis during World War II and earned a patent for an idea that laid the groundwork for such modern technologies as Bluetooth, GPs and Wi-Fi. Google honors her with an animated doodle on their search page.  Click to read more. 

♥~ 1934 – Carl (Edward) Sagan Pulitzer Prize-winning author: The Dragons of Eden [1978]; Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Broca’s Brain, Cosmos; astronomer: “Billions and billions of stars…”; died Dec 20, 1996 The Baloney Detection Kit: Carl Sagan’s Rules for Bullshit-Busting and Critical Thinking

♥~ 1936 – Mary Travers singer: Mary of Peter, Paul and Mary: Leaving on a Jet Plane, Blowin’ in the Wind, Puff the Magic Dragon, I Dig Rock ’n’ Roll Music; solo: LP: No Easy Walk to Freedom; died Sep 16, 2009

♥~ 1941 – Tom Fogerty musician, songwriter, singer: group: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Bad Moon Rising, Down on the Corner, Proud Mary, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Up Around the Bend; solo: Goodbye Media Man, Lady of Fatima, Beauty is Under the Skin, Joyful Resurrection; died Sep 6, 1990

♥~ 1984 – Delta Goodrem, Australian singer, actress, (Nina Tucker in TV soap opera Neighbours). 2002 Australian No.1 and 2003 UK No. 3 single ‘Born To Try’ plus six other Australian No.1 singles.

♥~ 1988 – Nikki Blonsky singer, actress: Hairspray, Waiting for Forever, Queen Sized

★~Berlin Wall Gallimaufry:

Berlinermauer, Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

Around the end of World War II and German surrender in 1945, a pair of peace conferences in Potsdam and Yalta split the defeated land into four territories controlled by the Allied powers. The Soviets took the East (known as the German Democratic Republic, or GDR), and the United States, Britain, and France each got a piece of the West. Berlin, the longtime capital, was also divided into East and West, even though it was located entirely within Soviet borders.

The barrier that was eventually erected on the city’s East/West border stood for nearly three decades. On November 9, 1989, East and West Germans converged on the Berlin Wall, successfully breaking through die Mauer. Below, a few things you might not know about the structure.

♥~ THE WALL WAS BUILT TO KEEP PEOPLE IN.

Between 1949 and 1961, almost 3 million people defected from East Germany to the West, and almost all went through Berlin. Each day thousands of Berliners on both sides crossed the border in order to work and shop, and though the city sat some 100 miles from the actual West/East border, defectors from the East were able to escape into the West due to this “loophole.” In the two and a half months prior to the wall going up, more than 67,000 people defected to the West, many of them doctors, teachers, students, and engineers. Roughly half were younger than 25.

Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev lamented this “brain drain,” and on August 13, 1961, the GDR closed the border between the two sides. Thus, unlike ancient walls built in China and northern England, die Mauer was not constructed to repel invaders; it was thrown together and manned to stop the incessant flow of Germans escaping to live and work in the West.

♥~ THE EAST GERMANS TORE UP CITY STREETS TO CONSTRUCT THE WALL.

GDR chairman Walter Ulbricht gathered government officials at a lake house on August 12, and by midnight, operational head Erich Honecker was given orders to seal the borders. He amassed more than 3000 troops, along with armored vehicles, in the city center. Another 4000 formed a security perimeter to prevent people from breaking through.

The next morning, GDR troops ripped apart the surface of Friedrich-Ebert Strasse and piled the loose chunks into a makeshift barrier, while armed guards stood in front ready to shoot any East Germans who tried to defect. Barbed-wire and posts were hastily added to lengthen and secure the makeshift structure, which eventually wound irregularly though the city and surrounding countryside and measured approximately 96 miles long.

♥~ THE WALL GREW OVER TIME.

Berlin Wall, Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

Although initially built with wayward parts, concrete slabs, and housing materials, over time—as people found a way to escape—the wall became more elaborate. In 1963, a border area was added behind the wall, which was reinforcedwith individual barriers and additional fencing. The wall topped out at 12 feet in places, with a pipe placed on top that made climbing over nearly impossible. Apartment buildings that straddled the border were either abandoned or torn down, and in the ’70s, an inner wall was built to eliminate access to the main fence.

♥~ THE WALL WAS LOADED WITH SECURITY MEASURES.

Berlin Wall, Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In addition to the concrete and barbed wire, the 96.3-mile wall came with 302 observation towers, 259 dog runs, 20 bunkers manned by more than 11,000 soldiers, and more than 79 miles of electrified fencing.

♥~ THE “DEATH STRIP” WAS AS SCARY AS IT SOUNDS.

For any East German attempting to escape, a 30-150 meter stretch called the “Death Strip” was put in place to halt defectors and stop any potential attacks. Along with the floodlights was a line of antitank barricades, a signal fence that activated an alarm, beds of nails called “Stalin’s lawn,” buried mines, and electrified fencing. A row of freshly raked sand was added to show footprints, and armed guards in towers had orders to shoot any would-be defector if the other measures were ineffective.

♥~ “CHECKPOINT CHARLIE” WAS THE MOST WELL-KNOWN CROSSING.

Berlin Wall, Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

A handful of border crossings allowed those with official documentation to move between the West and the East, and the Checkpoint C crossing at Friedrichstrasse was the only one used by foreigners and Allied forces. In October 1961, it was the site of a tank standoff between Soviet and U.S. forces. U.S. diplomat Edwin Allan Lightner was traveling to East Germany and was stopped at the border. But he refused to show his papers to the East German border guards, insisting that U.S. policy stated he was to only show them to the Soviets. After several days of escalating arguments about border access, the Allies sent 10 tanks to Checkpoint Charlie, and the Soviets followed suit. For 16 hours the tanks squared off before cooler heads prevailed and both sides backed down.

♥~ THE WALL IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MORE THAN 130 DEATHS.

Berlin Wall, Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

After being cut off from her sister, who lived just blocks away on the western side of the wall, Ida Siekmann, 58, jumped from the third-story window of her apartment building and died on August 22, 1961. The first shooting victim was Günter Litfin, who lived and worked in the West, but had returned to the East side prior to the wall going up. He tried to run across the railroad tracks, but was shot in the head by police on August 24.

Some estimates put the number of people who died attempting to cross to the West at more than 200, but a German research group confirmed 138 deaths

♥~ ABOUT HALF OF ALL EAST GERMAN DEFECTORS MADE IT.

Stories abound of East Germans flying balloons, ramming cars through the Wall, jumping out of windows, and shimmying down a wire to escape. About 5,000 people were able to make it of an estimated 10,000 who tried. Most, however, used bribes and forged documents to leave.

♥~ THE EAST GERMANS DYNAMITED AN ADJACENT CHURCH.

A chapel called the Church of Reconciliation, which was mainly used by West German worshippers, unfortunately sat in the Death Strip and was abandoned after the wall went up. On January 22, 1985, the East Germans blew up the crumbling, 19th century Protestant church.

♥~  TWO U.S. PRESIDENTS GAVE ICONIC SPEECHES THERE.

John F. Kennedy supposedly told White House aides that “a Wall is a hell of a lot better than a war,” and deflected suggestions that he deal with the Wall aggressively. But on June 26, 1963, just a few months before he was killed, he spoke in front of nearly half a million Germans on the steps of Berlin’s city hall, Rathaus Schöneberg, declaring “Ich bin ein Berliner (I am a Berliner)” in order to offer support to West Germany and offer a contrast between the two sides.

In June 1987, Ronald Reagan visited on Berlin’s 750th Anniversary, stood at the Brandenburg Gate, and demanded of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, “Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

♥~ THE BOSS ROCKED IT.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/9_hQit-3Vh0[/youtube]

Springsteen and the E-Street band performed a concert for over 300,000 in East Berlin in July 1988, and the show was also broadcast across the world. Speaking in German, Springsteen told the crowd, “I want to tell you that I’m not here for or against any government, I have come to play rock ‘n roll for the East Berliners, in the hope that one day all barriers will be torn down.”

♥~ WHEN IT FELL, IT FELL “IMMEDIATELY.”

Hungary loosened its physical borders in the summer of 1989 and more than 13,000 East German tourists streamed into Austria. Some restrictions were placed on citizens to prevent such a massive exodus, but the writing was on the wall. By the fall, longtime GDR leader Hoenecker was forced out of office, 500,000 people demonstrated in Berlin, and GDR spokesman Günter Schabowski declared in a press conference that citizens would be able to freely travel to the West “immediately.” The government tried to call for a slower, more orderly migration, but the order was taken literally and thousands of people stormed the wall, tearing it apart on both the East and West sides.

♥~ THE WALL CAN BE YOURS!

It took nearly a year for East and West Germany to become officially reunified. Meanwhile “mauerspechtes,” or wall peckers, chipped away at the concrete fortification and took pieces away for souvenirs and memorials. You can even buy a piece on eBay.

#

Chaos Never Dies Day, Scrapple Day

Time to rev up my Zippity Do Dah and get moving. In honor of the Berlin Wall and Chaos day I’m off to stir things up a bit. Hope you have a most wonderful day.

Odd Loves Company.

♥~

{ 4 comments }

Debbie

Thanks for the info on the Berlin Wall. I still get chills when I hear replays of Reagan demanding the Wall be torn down!

I was watching “Dallas” when Donna Reed joined the cast, and I was one of those disappointed fans. Yes, she was pretty, but she wasn’t “Mama”!!

Scrapple? I’ve never had it, but it doesn’t look too appetizing. Kinda favors cat food!

Say ‘Hi” to the boy and his truck!!
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Mike

Morno,
For some reason El Morno has not been showing up like it use to. I need to catch up.
I still haven’t tried Scrapple. Just doesn’t look that tasty. But my kids are home this week so I’ll be able to celebrate chaos.
Interesting facts about the Berlin wall. Hard to believe it was 26 years ago.
My Zippity was spent on the golf course this weekend. I overplayed but the weather was perfect.
Have a good one.

irene

Will read today’s history lesson in full a bit later. Time is of the essence!
I have family who eats/has eaten Scrapple. It’s an eastern PA region thing.
Iconic Rolling Stone 1st cover.
Can’t seen to sidestep chaos, can we?
Temps look good up there. They’re fluctuating here. Soon temps will make me happy!

Stephanie L. Robertson

Hi Katybeth,
I found your site from mnprairieroots. I’m a writer, would-be photographer (that is, a total beginner and trying to figure out all the photog lingo), mom, and wife.

I remember when they brought the Wall down, one of my favorite periods in history. One of my girlfriends in college brought home part of the Berlin Wall. (Supposedly. She probably bought it off a vendor who picked up the piece of concrete from his or her driveway.)

Well, I’ve got to go cheer for my college, U of Ala! Happy New Year!

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